Not wanting to leave the house

General Discussion About Anything Amityville And Other Paranormal Topics
Post Reply
User avatar
VampireKen
Amityville Film Historian
Posts: 1981
Location: Toms River, NJ
Contact:

Not wanting to leave the house

Post by VampireKen » Sat Dec 12, 2009 9:14 am

I know it's been brought up before and most recently with Dan's interview about the Lutzes not wanting to leave the house. What never occurred to me is that they reportedly had some money problems. Sometimes a problem that really bothers you prevents you from leaving your house or doing things very slow.
"Sometimes, it's not the house that's haunted. It's the People."-Self

For Info on Filming Details of the Amityville Horror Trilogy, please view http://amityvillefaq.com/truthboard/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=6594&start=210

User avatar
Tim
The monkey supplied the glue.
Posts: 639

Post by Tim » Sat Dec 12, 2009 11:47 am

George and Kathy paid the mortgage for 6 months after having moved out.Someone with "money problems" wouldn't be able to achieve this Ken. On what basis do you derive your theory?
"Things of this nature happen quite frequently,and when they happen to families, they usually close the door and they don't talk about it; and unless these things are talked about, they'll never be understood." - Kathy Lutz

User avatar
VampireKen
Amityville Film Historian
Posts: 1981
Location: Toms River, NJ
Contact:

Post by VampireKen » Sat Dec 12, 2009 12:00 pm

I said reportedly (should have allegedly). The book made them sound like they had money problems. and at the time of when they moved in they were near broke which may have caused them to have a little worry.
"Sometimes, it's not the house that's haunted. It's the People."-Self

For Info on Filming Details of the Amityville Horror Trilogy, please view http://amityvillefaq.com/truthboard/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=6594&start=210

User avatar
Dan the Damned
Lost Soul
Posts: 11572

Post by Dan the Damned » Sat Dec 12, 2009 1:19 pm

Yes, the book and movie made it seem like the Lutzes were having financial problems. But George flatly denied this:
GEORGE LUTZ: ...you understand even how the finances went for that house. Kathy and I were married the previous July and we each owned a house. And Kathy had her three kids, and we wanted a new house for the new marriage. So the idea was to sell both houses, and if we could find something on the water where I wouldn't have to pay the docking fees for my boat, and we would have that savings as well, then we would be financially way ahead of having the two...keeping the two houses or...plus the rental for the boat and the travel back and forth and all the rest.
GEORGE LUTZ: But there was a – there was – we asked each of the children individually and collectively, I mean we had family meetings about this, because this was a big purchase and there was also putting together an offer that would work for us financially. Having the two ho – our two homes sold – really put us ahead financially because this was on the water and we would no longer have docking fees at our boat yard, at the anchorage, for all the things that go along with that – just have a boat house and just pull the boat in and it had its own garage.

TAMARA THORNE: Yeah.

GEORGE LUTZ: So, just money-wise, we were actually ahead and it was a practical move in that sense.
GEORGE LUTZ: We looked at about 50 houses before we found this one. And the realtor told us that the house was in estate. And eventually she told us what happened in the house – that the six family members had been murdered there – and she asked us if that made a difference – if we were still interested in looking at it. We looked at the kids. We had Kathy's three children with us, and they didn't seem to have any reservations about whether to at least look at the house. And so we went through it.

Afterwards we had quite a discussion as a family a couple of different times about whether or not we should still consider buying the house. It was 4,000 square feet on the water. It had a boat house and a garage. It had a heated swimming pool in the backyard. Full basement. It was pretty much everything we were looking for, and it was at a price that we could afford if they were to take the offer that we were willing to make. Eventually everything worked out. The first bank we applied at we got a mortgage right away. We had just sold our two houses. We each had – Kathy had one and I had one. And for us it was a new marriage, and so we made arrangements to start moving in in November.

However, George also made comments like these, which seem to indicate that there may have been financial concerns:
GEORGE LUTZ: When we moved in there my business was fine. My grandfather had established the business in 1906 and my Dad had worked it until he died and then I took it over. The business was fine. We had credit to go to one bank and say "we'd like a mortgage for this" and they gave us a mortgage. I had two virtually brand new boats and what I wanted. And I don't know how many cars I owned then, I think it was at least five.

The – what happened in that 28 days with my finances was extraordinary. Kathy's brother was going to get married and the money was lost. We don't know – we don't blame that on the house, it was just another thing that happened during that time. He went to go pay the caterer and he didn't have the cash that he had at the house before we went to the...pay the caterer, so I had to write two post-dated checks to pay the caterer for that. And that came at a bad time. That was Christmastime and just moving into a new house and all of that. But we had sold two homes that were valued at more than the cost of that house. We had got rid of the two mortgages there and we had saved the money that we were spending on the boat storage. So financially it should have been a breeze. And yet in that 28 days my business, which was a land surveying business – a civil engineering land surveying business, what we were licensed to do – it slacked off to the point where it was very, very slow which was not unusual for the winter in New York, but it was more severe than it should have been or should have been expected – would have been normal for it to happen.

I had an audit by the IRS that uh, was just one of those things that happened during that time. I don't remember what it actually cost me to get rid of the fine that we had to pay, or the deficiency, but it was less than a thousand dollars. I mean it wasn't a big deal audit, but it was just one of those things that was a pressure that came up during that time. Uh, yeah, finances changed, and then we left there and things got better.
GEORGE LUTZ: And we said it didn't bother us when she told us – we want this house. If there's any way we can do it, we want to buy this house.

LORRAINE WARREN: If there was any way that you could financially...

GEORGE LUTZ: Financially afford it. Right. And we went to great pains to financially afford it.
GEORGE LUTZ: Its not something that just quit once we left. As a matter of fact every investigator that was involved on that March 6th investigation in 1976 has had a series of problems that were all quite similar in patterns – as far as financial problems, car accidents, problems with their own homes. The Warrens left there, the first time they went in, and they had, literally, a cyclone go through their house back in Connecticut. Its just incredible, I think, that there are 25-30 people that were involved – and if you just go with their stories alone and forget about us, its just unbelievable – the problems they've had – the divorces... Most of them have moved. There's only one person, I think, that hasn't moved yet from where they were living at the time. There isn't one person who was ever associated with it that hasn't gone through a period of financial problems – extreme financial problems – of unexplained headaches and nausea; draining sensations all of a sudden; inability to stop thinking about the house; incredible draws to go back to the house.
GEORGE LUTZ: I don't know that that is true. I don't believe that any family since us has ever had the house blessed or investigated by a serious psychic team. But they all have had financial problems. And it is probably the most divorced house in the United States; almost every couple that's lived there has since divorced.

User avatar
Brendan72
Forest Giant
Posts: 2970
Location: Australia
Contact:

Post by Brendan72 » Sat Dec 12, 2009 8:07 pm

Dan the Damned wrote:
GEORGE LUTZ: When we moved in there my business was fine. My grandfather had established the business in 1906 and my Dad had worked it until he died and then I took it over. The business was fine. We had credit to go to one bank and say "we'd like a mortgage for this" and they gave us a mortgage. I had two virtually brand new boats and what I wanted. And I don't know how many cars I owned then, I think it was at least five.

The – what happened in that 28 days with my finances was extraordinary. Kathy's brother was going to get married and the money was lost. We don't know – we don't blame that on the house, it was just another thing that happened during that time. He went to go pay the caterer and he didn't have the cash that he had at the house before we went to the...pay the caterer, so I had to write two post-dated checks to pay the caterer for that. And that came at a bad time. That was Christmastime and just moving into a new house and all of that. But we had sold two homes that were valued at more than the cost of that house. We had got rid of the two mortgages there and we had saved the money that we were spending on the boat storage. So financially it should have been a breeze. And yet in that 28 days my business, which was a land surveying business – a civil engineering land surveying business, what we were licensed to do – it slacked off to the point where it was very, very slow which was not unusual for the winter in New York, but it was more severe than it should have been or should have been expected – would have been normal for it to happen.

I had an audit by the IRS that uh, was just one of those things that happened during that time. I don't remember what it actually cost me to get rid of the fine that we had to pay, or the deficiency, but it was less than a thousand dollars. I mean it wasn't a big deal audit, but it was just one of those things that was a pressure that came up during that time. Uh, yeah, finances changed, and then we left there and things got better.
GEORGE LUTZ: And we said it didn't bother us when she told us – we want this house. If there's any way we can do it, we want to buy this house.

LORRAINE WARREN: If there was any way that you could financially...

GEORGE LUTZ: Financially afford it. Right. And we went to great pains to financially afford it.
GEORGE LUTZ: Its not something that just quit once we left. As a matter of fact every investigator that was involved on that March 6th investigation in 1976 has had a series of problems that were all quite similar in patterns – as far as financial problems, car accidents, problems with their own homes. The Warrens left there, the first time they went in, and they had, literally, a cyclone go through their house back in Connecticut. Its just incredible, I think, that there are 25-30 people that were involved – and if you just go with their stories alone and forget about us, its just unbelievable – the problems they've had – the divorces... Most of them have moved. There's only one person, I think, that hasn't moved yet from where they were living at the time. There isn't one person who was ever associated with it that hasn't gone through a period of financial problems – extreme financial problems – of unexplained headaches and nausea; draining sensations all of a sudden; inability to stop thinking about the house; incredible draws to go back to the house.
GEORGE LUTZ: I don't know that that is true. I don't believe that any family since us has ever had the house blessed or investigated by a serious psychic team. But they all have had financial problems. And it is probably the most divorced house in the United States; almost every couple that's lived there has since divorced.
It is very easy for someone who just read those aspects alone to think that a hoax was being perpetrated, particularly since over the years it has been one of the many aspects of the case in which nay-sayers such as William Weber have steadfastly maintained.

As soon as the IRS audit and financial problems during the 28 days begin to be mentioned, as well as it mentioned in both the book and film, then it is easy for someone who is not entirely familiar with the case to think that.

Once these things are mentioned it is very difficult to convince anyone that these things only happened during the 28 days in the house, whereas prior to moving in the house business was booming, they made above propertly value price on both George and Kathy's houses and how, because of the boat house, they were saving money from rental for the two boats. Also mentioning the fact they were in a comfortable position financially to get mortgage approval at the first bank they applied for a loan, then this would help erase any suspision.

Fortunately alot of people will take that into consideration. Unfortunately a good percentage of people might write the whole thing off on the basis of flimsy allegations that although are factual do not in themselves substantiate wrongdoings on the part of the Lutz's.
- Brendan72

"May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house."
- George Carlin. Comedian. (1937-2008)

Wallace
Amityville Member
Posts: 38

Post by Wallace » Sun Dec 13, 2009 12:34 am

If I am not mistaken, didn't the Lutz's receive a bank loan before purchasing the house? I always found it odd that the bank would give them a loan if they were really as bad off as it has been claimed. During that time banks usually made sure that they gave loans to people who could pay them back.

User avatar
Howard64
ta-wo-di u-s-di
Posts: 4017
Location: Athens, Texas

Post by Howard64 » Sun Dec 13, 2009 7:20 am

banks still work the same way today wallace...
" A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of
the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

jimmysmokes
Amityville Addict
Posts: 661

Re:

Post by jimmysmokes » Mon Nov 30, 2020 7:18 pm

Howard64 wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2009 7:20 am
banks still work the same way today wallace...
:clap: Thanks Wally for the comedy tonight. I'm virtually in tears laughing. And I agree with you Wally in your above post, well somewhat? Generally banks give out loans to people, even the ones that sign on the line stating that the owners will "repay". Even though the bank sold the Lutzes a haunted house, luckily, the bank was able to repossess the house a few months later. I heard later the family involved got themselves a book deal and high-tailed it to California. Bank resold the house, time and time again, so it worked out well for all involved.

Wallace
Amityville Member
Posts: 38

Re: Not wanting to leave the house

Post by Wallace » Mon Nov 30, 2020 9:22 pm

I hate to respond to a post that is eleven years old, but hasn't anyone heard of the financial crisis of 2008? One of the things that created the housing bubble that led to that crisis were the banks approving loans for clients who couldn't afford to pay them. i think that is what I was making a reference to, though I didn't even remember making that post, until Jimmy brought up this old thread. I am not even going to respond to him, since his arguments seem to make less sense every time he posts.

User avatar
The Bullshit Sheriff
Amityville Member
Posts: 75

Re: Not wanting to leave the house

Post by The Bullshit Sheriff » Mon Nov 30, 2020 10:18 pm

jimmysmokes wrote:
Mon Nov 30, 2020 7:18 pm
Howard64 wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2009 7:20 am
banks still work the same way today wallace...
:clap: Thanks Wally for the comedy tonight. I'm virtually in tears laughing. And I agree with you Wally in your above post, well somewhat? Generally banks give out loans to people, even the ones that sign on the line stating that the owners will "repay". Even though the bank sold the Lutzes a haunted house, luckily, the bank was able to repossess the house a few months later. I heard later the family involved got themselves a book deal and high-tailed it to California. Bank resold the house, time and time again, so it worked out well for all involved.
Are you THAT desperate jimmysmokes? :roll:

jimmysmokes
Amityville Addict
Posts: 661

Re: Not wanting to leave the house

Post by jimmysmokes » Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:08 am

Sounds like you are desperate! You keep trolling me around in here and butting into my conversations so find something else to do with your life. I realize you have no life but you’re not going to take it out on me for your short comings or limited vocabulary.

You got that, Andy Griffith?

Post Reply